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The Language of Empire in .NET Print Data Matrix barcode in .NET The Language of Empire




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The Language of Empire generate, create 2d data matrix barcode none on .net projects QR Code Standardiztion of the estate VS .NET Data Matrix ECC200 s and villas of the Roman rich.217 He uses provincialis thirteen times, eleven being of the communities of those in the provinces218 (two of which occurrences relate to those who are not Roman citizens),219 one of a war outside Italy220 and one of the origins of Seneca.

221 Suetonius uses imperium 101 times, with a similar range of meaning to that found in Tacitus, though he only has four instances in which it carries the sense of the empire as a territorial entity, of which three are each referring to the account of the resources of the empire which Augustus drew up when he was ill in 23 bc and again just before his death,222 the fourth being Suetonius record of Augustus remark that he regarded allied kings no differently from members and parts of the imperium .223 In this last he seems to relate to the image of the corpus imperii, which, as we have seen, was a commonplace among post-Augustan authors. Otherwise, Suetonius uses imperium to mean order twice in a fragment from the Prata224 and twice in a generalised sense in his life of Julius.

225 When describing the power of individuals, by far the most common context is the imperium of the emperor, which occurs sixty-three times.226 Of other magistrates, he uses it sixteen times, almost always in the sense of a command , rather than the power of the individual.227 In one place, however, he.

217 218 219 223. 224 226. Ann. 3.54.

Ag r. 4.4; Hist.

2.80; 2.98; Ann.

3.33; 4.20; 11.

24; 12.49; 15.3; 15.

20 (twice); 15.21. Ann.

12.49; 15.3.

220 Hist. 1.89.

221 Ann. 14.53.

222 Aug. 28.1; 101.

4; Calig. 16.1.

Aug. 48.1: nec aliter universos quam membra partisque imperii curae habuit .

See above, pp. 144 5. Prata fr.

176. 225 Jul. 30.

5; 61.1. Tib.

24.1; 24.2; 38.

1; 55.1; 67.2; 73.

1; Calig. 12.2; 13.

1; 16.4; 24.1; 26.

1; 60.1; Claud. 7.

1; 10.1; 11.1; 27.

2; 35.1; 35.2; 36.

1 (three times); 45.1; Nero 6.3; 9.

1; 20.1; 22.1; 34.

1; 35.4; 35.5; 42.

1; Galba 4.1; 4.2; 8.

2; 14.1; 23.1; Otho 4.

1; 4.2; 7.1; 8.

1; 11.2; Vit. 2.

4; 9.1; 10.1; 12.

1 (twice); 14.1; 15.1; 15.

2; Vesp. 5.1; 7.

1; 16.3; Tit. 1.

1; 5.1; 6.1; 9.

1; 9.3; Dom. 2.

3; 13.1; 13.3; 15.

2; 17.3; 20.1; De gram.

et rhet. 25.6.

Jul. 11.1; 24.

1; 25.1; 26.1; 54.

1; 75.4; 76.3; Aug.

23.1; 25.1; 29.

2; 47.1; 61.1; Tib.

12.2; 30.1; Nero 3.

2; Otho 1.2..

After Augustus uses the old phrase cum imperio, describing commanders sent out to provinciae,228 though in ve places he distinguishes between imperia and magistratus;229 and in one case uses it of a command given to a man who may not have been a magistrate or pro-magistrate at all.230 He uses the word of the power of the Roman people fourteen times (in addition to the four mentioned above), two in a general sense of worldwide power231 and twelve which relate to the state as a whole.232 In the case of provincia, Suetonius uses the word 105 times, and these instances are divided almost equally between those which are speci ed as the responsibility of an individual magistrate or promagistrate ( fty-three)233 and those which are referred to as the possessions of Rome as a whole ( fty-one).

234 The one instance which does not fall into either category is a quotation from Cicero, written from his retreat at Astura in 45 bc, where he says that his provincia is solitude and retirement.235 Among the individuals, Suetonius mentions the provinciae of quaestors, of the emperor and, on four occasions, of praesides.236 When writing of provinciae in.

228 230. 231 232. 235 236. Aug. 29.2.

22 9 Jul. 54.1; 75.

4; Aug. 61.1; Tib.

12.2; Otho 1.2.

Jul. 76.3 (of Ru o, the son of Julius Caesar s former freedman, left in charge of Alexandria with three legions).

Aug. 21.2; Calig.

8.5. Jul.

44.1; 79.3; Aug.

28.3; 31.5; Tib.

21.7; 41.1; Nero 11.

2; 18.1; 31.4; Vesp.

1.1; 8.5; Dom.

3.2. Jul.

9.3; 11.1; 13.

1; 18.1; 18.2; 19.

2; 22.1; 23.1; 24.

1; 28.3; 29.2; 31.

2; 35.1; 48.1; Aug.

3.2; 10.2; 23.

1; 29.2; 36.1; 47.

1; 57.2; 66.2; 67.

2; Tib. 3.2; 16.

1; 21.1; 32.2; 41.

1; 42.1; 63.2; Calig.

25.2; 48.1; Claud.

1.4; 16.2; 17.

3; 24.2; Nero 2.1; 37.

3; 40.1; 43.2; Galba 6.

1; 7.1; 8.2; 9.

1; Otho 4.1; Vit. 3.

2; 5.1; 12.1; Vesp.

2.3; 4.4; 4.

6; Tit. 5.2; De gram.

et rhet. 10.3.

Jul. 4.2; 25.

1; 28.1; 48.1; 54.

2; 59.1; Aug. 18.

2; 33.3; 47.1; 49.

1 (provinciatim, a hapax); 49.3; 52.1; 59.

1; 60.1; 64.1; 89.

2; Tib. 36.1; 37.

4; 38.1; 48.2; Calig.

1.2; 13.1; 51.

3; Claud. 15.3; 16.

2; 23.1; 23.2; 25.

3; 28.1; 42.1; Nero 18.

1; 24.2; 38.3; 40.

4; 42.2; 43.1; Galba 6.

3; 10.2; 10.3; Otho 7.

1; Vit. 8.2; Vesp.

6.4; 8.2; 8.

4; 16.1; Tit. 4.

1; Dom. 7.2; 8.

2; De gram. et rhet. 3.

6; 24.2; 30.6.

De gram. et rhet. 14.

2, quoting Cicero, Att. 12.26.

2. See above, p. 79.

Quaestor (3): Claud. 24.2 (aerarium); Otho 4.

1 (Lusitania); Vesp. 2.3 (Crete and Cyrene).

Emperor (2): (Aug. 66.2; Tib.

21.1). Praeses (4): Jul.

35.1; Aug. 23.

1; Tib. 32.2; Claud.

17.3 (compare also at Otho 7.1; Vesp.

6.4; Dom. 8.

2)..
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