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Pocock, Ancient constitution revisited 255. using barcode integration for none control to generate, create none image in none applications.qr code generator asp.net chapter 2 VB.NET The classical heritage I: Philology and lexicography the labours of he none for none rcules: lexicography and the classical heritage at the time of erasmus A literary canon is de ned in order to embody a cultural heritage. When the philologists of Hellenistic Alexandria made lists of the authors whose writings merited particular attention, they were selecting a heritage, saying that these authors were connected with their own period, and encouraging the reinforcement of that connection by imitation.1 The theme of the imitation of selected ancients the classici as they were called as early as the second century ad has a long history, from Statius closing of his epic Thebais with the injunction to the poem to follow the footsteps of Virgil s Aeneid and worship them at a respectful distance, through Chaucer s injunction to his poem Troilus and Criseyde to kis the steppes, wheras thou seest pace Virgile, Ovyde, Omer, Lucan and Stace .

2 There has been a classical heritage for as long as there has been a canon of classical authors in whose footsteps a reader might try to follow. In the fourteenth and fteenth centuries, the canon that had been known and available in ancient Rome was known no longer to be fully available, and earnest efforts to recover it were being made: this is the familiar story of the textual rediscoveries of the Renaissance. An intersection of this story of the recovery of a textual heritage with the story of lexicography took place in 1508, as Erasmus worked on a dictionary of ancient sayings and allusions, the Adagia, in the combined household and printing works, the of cina, of Aldus Manutius in Venice.

I perceived quite clearly , he wrote,. that this was no job for one man or one library . . .

and I have nished it . . .

with the assistance of only one library. It was of course the library at the house of. 1 Pfeiffer, HCS I 203 7. See, e.g., Curtius, European literature and the Latin Middle Ages 247 64. Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe Aldus, and so it none none was as rich and well supplied with good books as any anywhere, particularly Greek, being as it were the source from which all good libraries world-wide spring and increase.3. Erasmus remarked elsewhere on the way that manuscripts poured into the of cina:. How often were an none for none cient copies sent him unsought from Hungary or Poland, and complimentary presents with them, so that with all needful diligence he might publish them . . .

When I, a Dutchman, was in Italy, preparing to publish my book of Adagia, all the learned men there had offered me, unsought, authors not yet published in print who they thought might be of use to me and Aldus had nothing in his treasure-house that he did not share with me . . .

Just consider what advantages I should have lost, had not scholars supplied me with texts in manuscript.4. He went on to enn umerate some of the manuscripts that were sent to the Aldine of cina for his use: the works of Plato and of Plutarch, the Deipnosophistae of Athenaeus, Eustathios of Thessalonica s commentaries on Homer, Pausanias description of Greece.5 Although some were unsought, others clearly were solicited: Aldus reminded an eastern European friend in 1502 that in the past you promised, whatever the cost, to send and search for books in the land of the Dacians, where men say there is a tower full of ancient books .6 As Aldus and Erasmus knew, not all owners of manuscripts were generous with them; the ideal that privilege entails stewardship was not universal.

In the early 1490s, Aldus had been unable to borrow manuscripts he needed; by 1497, he could say proudly that Greek manuscripts were regularly sent to him for his use, but still added the hope that if there should be people so evilly disposed that they grieve at a good. Erasmus, Adagia i none none ii i 1 ( Herculei labores ), ASD ii 5:36, Plane perspiciebam hunc laborem nec vnius esse hominis nec vnius bibliothecae . . .

quem nos soli . . .

absoluimus vna duntaxat adiuti bibliotheca, nimirum Aldina copiosissima quidem illa quaque non alia bonis libris praecipue Graecis instructior, vt ex qua ceu fonte omnes bonae bibliothecae per omnem vsque orbem nascuntur ac propagantur trans. adapted from CWE xxxiv:179. Erasmus, Adagia ii i 1 ( Festina lente ), addition of 1526, LB ii:405, Quoties ad illum ab Hungaris ac Polonis missa sunt ultro vetusta exemplaria, non sine honorario munere, ut ea justa cura publicarent orbi .

. . Cum apud Italos ederem Proverbiorum opus homo Batavus, quotquot illic aderant eruditi ultro suppeditabant auctores nondum per typographos evulgatos, quos mihi suspicabantur usui futuros, Aldus nihil habebat in thesauro suo, quod non communicaret .

. . Hic mihi cogita quanta pars utilitas abfutura fuerit, nisi docti libros manu descriptos suppeditassent , trans.

altered from CWE xxxiii:14. Ibid.; see Geanakoplos, Greek scholars in Venice 263 5 for discussion.

Manutius, dedication of Valerius Maximus (1502) in Aldo Manuzio editore i:67, pollicitus es tua quamvis magna impensa ad Dacas usque mittere inveniendi librorum gratia, quod ibi antiquorum librorum plena turris esse dicatur , trans. Lowry, World of Aldus Manutius 197..

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