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Set Intersection and Set Difference in Oracle in Java Create UPC Code in Java Set Intersection and Set Difference in Oracle

Set Intersection and Set Difference in Oracle using spring framework toaccess upc-a supplement 2 with asp.net web,windows application Platform SDK Key Points 16 Cross Joins,. Self Joins, and CrossTab Queries . . . . . 597 Cross Joins 599 601 601 605 604 608 611. 16-1 Definition of a cross join 16-2 Why are cross joins important 16-4 The properties of an inner join 16-3 An inner join is derived from a cross join 16-5 An error in the j jvm GTIN - 12 oin condition can appear to be a cross join 16-6 Using a cross join to list all the possible combinations 16-7 Other layouts when there are three or more dimensions 16-8 Avoid a cross join of large tables 612 613. Self Joins 616 618 621 624. 16-9 Why would you eve r join a table with itself 16-10 An example of a self join 16-11 Handling a sequence of events. 16-12 Generating the numbers from 0 to 999 CrossTab Queries in Access 631 638. 16-13 CrossTab queries when there are two dimensions 16-14 CrossTab queries with up to four dimensions 16-15 CrossTab queries with more dimensions 16-17 CrossTab to show the foods for each lunch 633 641 16-16 CrossTab to show who is attending each lunch. CrossTab Queries in Oracle 645 647. 16-18 CrossTab queries in Oracle Part 1 16-19 CrossTab queries in Oracle Part 2 Key Points CONTENTS 17 Combining Tables in a Production Database . . . . . . . . 653 Methods of Joining Three or More Tables 655 658 658. 17-1 Joining several tables in a series of steps 17-2 Joining several t ables at once in the where clause 17-3 Joining several tables at once in the from clause. Losing Information 660 660 661. 17-4 Be careful with an inner join 17-5 Be careful with a left and right outer join 17-7 A full outer join of several tables 17-8 Monitor your queries 17-9 Use the indexes 664 663 661. 17-6 A full outer join preserves all the information Caring about the Efficiency of Your Computer 17-10 Select the data GS1 - 12 for Java you want early in the process 17-11 Use a table to save summarized data 17-12 Try several ways of writing the SQL 665 665. Standardizing the Way That Tables Are Joined 17-13 The joins are part of the database design 17-15 Ad hoc reporting 670 666 666. 17-14 A view can standardize the way tables are joined Key Points 18 If-Then-Else, Parameter Queries, and Subqueries . . . 673 If-Then-Else Logic 675 680 685. 18-1 The case and deco de functions in Oracle 18-2 The Immediate If (iif) function in Access 18-3 Attaching messages to rows 683. 18-4 Dividing data fro UPC Symbol for Java m one column into two different columns 18-5 Applying two functions to different parts of the data 687. Parameter Queries 690 693 695. 18-6 A parameter query in Oracle 18-7 Using a parameter more than once in Oracle 18-8 More ways to define parameters in Oracle xxii CONTENTS 18-9 A parameter query in Access 698 699 700 18-10 A query in Access with two parameters 18-11 Limitations on parameters in Access Subqueries 701 703 706. 18-12 Introduction to subqueries 18-13 Subqueries that GS1 - 12 for Java result in a list of values 18-14 Subqueries that result in a single value 18-15 Avoid using not in with nulls 708. Applications of Subqueries 710 712. 18-16 Subqueries used in an update command 18-17 Finding the difference between two tables 18-18 Using the most current data 714. Older Features of Subqueries 18-19 Correlated subqueries 714 716 717 719 719. 18-20 Subqueries using exists 18-22 Nested subqueries 718 18-21 Using a subquery to write an outer join 18-23 Subqueries can b e used in limited locations 18-24 Many subqueries can also be written as a join. Key Points 19 The Multiuser Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 721 Database Configurations 723 724 725 726. 19-1 The single-user e GS1 - 12 for Java nvironment 19-2 The multiuser environment 19-3 The distributed environment 19-4 Connecting via the Internet. Operating in a Multiuser Environment 19-6 Synonyms 19-7 Snapshots 728 730 19-5 How to use a table you do not own Security and Privileges 19-9 Privileges 732 19-8 Identifying the user CONTENTS 19-10 Roles 734 736 xxiii 19-11 Several people can use the same table at the same time The Oracle Data Dictionary and the Multiuser Environment 19-12 ALL versus USER spring framework GTIN - 12 736 19-13 How to find the tables youwant in the Data Dictionary 19-14 How to find the meaning of the columns 737. Key Points 20 The Design of SQL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 739 Original SQL Design Objectives 20-1 Do one thing and do it well 20-2 Focus on information 20-3 Keep it simple 742 741 741 743. 20-4 Coordinate people to work together Newer Interfaces 20-5 Forms 20-6 Reports 20-7 Web tools 744 744 745. Typical Applications 20-9 OLTP 748 748 748. 20-8 Smaller databases 20-10 Data warehouses Key Points Appendix A Oracle Is Free: How to Get Your Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 751 Getting Current Inform spring framework GS1 - 12 ation 752 Which Version of Oracle Should You Get 752 System Requirements 753 Downloading Oracle from the Internet 753 Installing Oracle 754 Setup to Run the Examples in This Book 754. A-1 Create a new database user 755 758 A-2 Download the files to build the Oracle tables xxiv CONTENTS A-3 Build the Oracle tables by running an SQL script A-4 Disaster recovery if you need it 763 758 How to Stop Running Oracle 763 What to Do if Oracle Slows Down Your Computer A-5 The official Oracle solution A-6 My own solution Appendix B Quick Start with Oracle 764 763 Log in to Your Compute r 766 Go to the Database Home Page 766 Log in to the Oracle Database 768 Go to the SQL Commands Page 768 Enter and Run an SQL Query 769 Optional: Print Your Query and the Results. Appendix C Quick Start with Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 771 You May Use Access 200 7, 2003, 2002, or 2000 How to Start Access 772 Entering an SQL Query 774 Dealing with Errors in Access 776 Printing from Access 777 Using the Access Trust Center 778. Appendix D Diagram of the Lunches Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 783 Join Conditions 784 Data Validation Rules Index 787 PREFACE SQL is one of the most Universal Product Code version A for Java important computer languages. It is the language of databases. Whenever you search for the information you need in a large library of information, the code that performs the search is likely to be using SQL.

Many applications in which you share information to coordinate with other people also use SQL. It is used in more than 100 software products, and new ones are being added all the time. This book shows you how to get the most out of the databases you use.

It explains how to use SQL to solve practical problems, using the most widely used SQL products, Oracle and Microsoft Access. Oracle and Access are both widely used, easily available, and run on personal computers. By learning these two products in detail, you will have all the basic skills to use any of the many products based on SQL.

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